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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 195 (some duplicates have been removed)
's the latest mickey mouse gimmick to win elections without having to win the most number of votes. remember the tricks they tried in 2012? all those changes in the voting times, all those cuts in the number of voting booths, all that effort to make it harder for people to vote? all that targeting of the people who tend to vote in ways the remembers don't like people voting? remember all that? well, now they're trying something new. they don't like that states like pennsylvania regularly vote democratic. so some political quacks came up with the idea of breaking up the state's electoral votes so the rural areas will get more power. they don't like the urban vote, as they call it, going to democratic. so they decided to kill its power over how the state goes overall. look, the real fight here is by the republicans against the country's shifting demographics. if they don't get or can't get people to vote for them they try to kill the power of those who don't. will they get away with it? not if you stay tuned and keep an eye on these little buggers. they've got their mickey mouse ears on, they'
the next election. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> i think the surprise was some of the turnout. some of the turnout, especially in urban areas. >> forget policy. if you can't win it, just go ahead and rig it. the gop moves to steal elections. first stop? virginia. david corn and charnelle herring tell us if the dirty move could work. the right still can't handle hillary. >> she obviously has an enduring media. >> so the king of the sunday shows bites the hand that feeds him. >> the president's vision for his second term to annihilate the republican party. >> richard wolffee on the republican party's new nerve. >>> democrats just missed a huge opportunity to change the o'country. larry cohen on harry reiding filibuster cave. >>> women get overdue recognition to serve in combat. the right wing is freaking out. former marine goldie taylor is here to put them in their place. >>> thanks for watching. it's time to wake up, america. got to pay attention to this one. the republican attempt to steal the next presidential election, it has hit full throttle. this is the lat
pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimon
on president obama's foreign policy challenges in his second term. what's the meaning of the election in israel this week as that gets sorted out and netanyahu tries to build a new government? there's the threat of iran, what do we make of it? >> well, we have to see what government actually is formed, it's a coalition government in israel. i think it's likely now to be a center-right government rather than the right wing rump government that looked likely given the pulse before the election. that is essentially better news. it means that israel is going, i think, to be more willing to engage in making peace with the palestinians. that the two-stage solution which is on life support at the moment has a chance to breathe again. i wouldn't take it further than that, but there's a limited sliver of hope put it that way in that regard. when it comes to iran, i don't think the election changes things that much. essentially this is an american-led problem. and as much as netanyahu threatens force, i think he will take the lead from president obama who has made it clear he's not going to allow iran to
in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in b
a barn burner of an election coming up tomorrow. i sure hope you make it though. and just one piece of advice as you start gearing up for this campaign. i don't think you need to use that whole or cathing for that voter turnout tomorrow. i'm just having a little fun. just starting the night with a little fun. on a serious and sincere note i want to say on bhave of myself and other republican governors, i want to thank the chairman for his leadership at the r.n.c. >> as a point of personal privilege i want to thank the members from my home state of louisiana. roger has been a great partner. let's absolutely give him a round of applause. [applause] . we also have our national committee woman who does a phenomenal job representing our state as well. >> and ross little, when i sat down i said ross you are no long ter most attractive committee person from louisiana. but does a great job. >> let me tell you in advance. i plan to talk about the big picture tonight and i may say some things that may challenge your asuppingses. you may agree or not agree and that's okay. ours is a party that
. with the nothing in the 2012 national election behind them, and the risk of demographic doom at the hands of surging minority groups growing every day the g.o.p. is making an all-out effort to reboot the whole brand. last night luis boy governor bobby jindal had this advice for his party at the republican national committee's winter meeting in charlotte, north carolina. >> we got to stop being the stupid party. i'm serious. it's time for the new republican party that talks like adults. it's time for us to articulate our plans and visions for america in real terms. it's no secret that we had a number of republicans that damaged the brand this year with offensive and bizarre comments. i'm here to say we've had enough of that. >> john: just how the party plans to keep four todd akin and richard mourdock's from disgorging off-hand comments on legitimate rape and rape-born children as something god intend intended remains to be seen. but reince priebus the g.o.p. chair has vision of a renewed republican party. we can renewt americans around our values if we can prove we can take them to a bet
that they're willing to work with this president? now that he has won two elections, and clearly the last one? >> you know, i hope so. we talk off camera -- >> you don't sound confident. >> well, here is the thing there are a lot of good folks in the republican caucus. i want to say that. and i mean that. but once they start voting, will they vote their conscience or will they vote what the tea party extremists demand. and that is the question. that's a question they have to answer. now some of their leaders said we're going to give -- we're going to take him out. our key agenda is to take out obama and make him a one-term president. they failed. i hope enough republicans are out there to do what is right now. >> congressman, four years ago tonight, there were a group of republicans that met at a restaurant. >> yes, there was. >> that set the course of obstruction. and they said we're going to say no to everything. what kind of dinner are they going to have tonight? >> is crow on the menu? >> i said that earlier today in our broadcast. they should probably be serving that today. but the p
on what happened to them in the last election. gun control. more republicans backing things like background checks, they stand a good chance of getting stuff done in the next year, while the president has the leverage on his side. >> okay. let's look at another couple of challenges for you, ed. sequestration, that starts march 1st. debt ceiling suspension expiring on may 19th. you think the president's policy goals will get bogged down because of these upcoming deadlines? >> that's an interesting question. we are trying to sort that one out. this punt into may, with the debt ceiling suggests that it buys everyone time on fiscal issues and might allow congress to turn its attention to immigration and gun control and other issues. certainly, the fiscal debate isn't going anywhere. a big question, will sequestration indeed happen if it does happen, does it happen assith currently written, do we make changes or the white house come up with a way to stave it off and get republicans and democrats to agree? a big push under way to get started on gun control, immigration, hearings next w
think he should not be, i don't know if arrogant is the right word. he won the election. he won it fair and square, to doubt about that, but i think there's been a tone of almost like an imperious tone the last few times. i'm not saying it will guarantee results if he's more outreach and republicans respond. i think he should try it. even independent voters have told me they thought the news conference last week was had too much arrogance and some of his tone. having said that, listen, he had some scars from the last four years. i guess he wants to get a little revenge. i think if he wants to make progress, he should try at least -- >> give him some advice. health care was the big first initiative or the stimulus program and health care, issues on which the republicans wanted no part of what the president wanted. and a lot of republicans say it poisoned the waters. when you look at the agenda now, there's the economy, the deficit, gun control, immigration. what should the president do first to show republicans he's not looking for revenge or looking to pick fights? >> i would say the bu
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
east. but because of elections, elections, today governments across the middle east in egypt, tunisia, libya, pal stipe, turkey, iraq -- palestine, turkey, iraq, they are all pursuing at least, at least independent foreign policies which are by definition much less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states and much more open to the islamic republic of iran. simply put, today the united states is in a profoundly weaker position in the middle east, and the islamic republic of rapp is in a significantly -- of iran is in a significantly stronger position. that has essentially happened because there has been a dramatic shift in the middle east balance of power. in our book, "going to tehran," we describe how part of why this shift has and is occurring is because of mistakes in american policies in the middle east. but we also describe in our book that part of what is going on is something vastly upside appreciated in -- underappreciated in the west which are the successes of the islamic republic of iran which are also driving the shift in the regional balance of power
about whether or not you're in favor of term limits for all elected officials. termresident already has limits. your governors, senators, mayors, city council, dog catcher, tax collector. are you in favor of term limits, yes or no? here are the numbers. host: you can also reach out to us by social media. host: i want to show you some of the numbers from the recently released gallup poll. they ask americans support for establishing term limits for federal lawmakers. suppose on election day you could vote for key issues as well as candidates. or againstote for the number of terms congress and senate can serve? nationally among adults those voting for term limits are in the 75% range. those who say they would vote against term limits, 21%. those who had no opinion, 5%. breaking it down among political parties, republicans, those voting for, who say they would vote for term limits, 82% of republicans questioned in this gallup poll, 82% say they would vote for term limits. 15% say they would vote against. 3% say they have no opinion. independence, 79% say they would vote for term limits. 17%
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
-span.org. >> millionaire investor and republican foster freeze spoke to reporters about the 2012 elections and the future of the republican party. he backed rick santorum in the presidential race. this hour long event in washington, d.c. was hosted by the christian science monitor. >> okay, here we go. i'm dave cook from the monitor. thanks for coming. our guest this morning is foster, visiting our fair city from his home in jackson, wyoming, accompanied by one of his advisers, matthew taylor. he was born in rice lake, wisconsin and earned his degree in business administration at the university of wisconsin where he met his wife, lynn. he served two years as an army intelligence officer, and then he founded freeze associates, an investment firm whose funds were wildly successful. he sold a controlling interest in the firm in 2001, but remains as chairman of freeze sorts and director of randy funds, and in recent years, focused on philanthropy and political activism including being the largest donor to senator santorum's 2012 political campaign. all of that, hunting the occasional 14-foot crocodile in tan
that make this country great. >> i saw that as essentially sort of a bottom line on the election that got him to this day. >> yes. >> maybe a signal about what is to come in terms of the governing fights in washington. >> absolutely. it is quite likely that there will be some give and some compromise. but he is creating a bottom line here beyond which he will not go. and that is a very strong signal for these budget fights to come. but writ more broadly, i was thinking of martin luther king jr. and of equal rights and of the refrain that, you know, our job is not done, what he basically was saying is our journey is not complete, to use his words. >> our journey is not complete. those are the two repeated phrases. our journey is not complete, and you and i as citizens, you and i. >> exactly. this is an exclusive moment. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are recognized as equal under the law. he is talking about doma, the supreme court argument to come. he is surrounded by the supreme court right this. and he talked about stonewall. ta talking about stonewall in
have that very long, hard, primary campaign. in politics and in democracy, sometimes you win elections, sometimes you lose elections. and i worked very hard, but i lost. and then president obama asked me to be secretary of state. and i said yes. and why did he ask me and why did i say yes? because we both love our country. >> let me bring in political reporter for "u.s. news and world report" lauren fox and white house reporter david nakimura. david the first sit down interview the president has done with anyone other than the first lady. why do this? why do it now? >> i think t.j. the timing is secretary of state has served for four years. now she's leaving. she's had a bit of a tough run lately with her personal health and the situation in benghazi where the consulate came under attack. four diplomats were killed. she was in a hearing just last week. i think the president wanted to sit down and show a real thanks first of all and a show of support as she leaves. it will be interesting obviously as speculation comes in a couple of years whether she'll run for president against possibl
has his eye towards the general election, that he does not see his advantage in being as obstructionist as he was the last two years. he has an obvious advantage in kentucky. it is a red state. it is possible that there could be a democrat that could come up, if there is too much frustration. he is the senate, as much as harry reid is, because he is a party leader. congress's approval rating is in the single digits. that is not exactly something you want when you're going before voters. the more he can look reasonable, the better he looks. host: ryan grim, explaining some of the changes to the filibuster rule. he is the washington bureau chief for the -- for "the huffington post." back to your calls -- we're focusing on the pentagon lifting the ban on combat roles for women. on twitter -- from our facebook page -- tracey says -- sac joins us from philadelphia, good morning, on the democrats' line. -- zach joins us from philadelphia, good morning, on the democrats' line. caller: when we look at the labor market, allowing men and women to serve together, it will have hug
have real challenges. and we did get whipped in the presidential election. and that's not something that we take lightly. >> but so far, there is no consensus about how to fix them. republican national committee chairman, reince priebus, is expected to be re-elected today, after quietly making nice with ron paul supporters and heading off any challenge to his leadership. he'll call for a, quote, republican renewal, in a speech this afternoon. but the rnc committee drafting the plan for change is made up of party insiders, rather than anyone who's likely to break china. meanwhile, republican governors are griping privately and publicly that the gop in washington is doing nothing to help the republican brand, after being schooled by new jersey governor chris christie. washington republicans got a talking-to last night from louisiana governor, bobby jindal, who said the gop has to stop being a stupid party and talk like adults. >> today's conservatism is completely wrapped up in solving the hideous mess that is the federal budget. we have seemed to have an obsession with government boo
the racial progress our society has made, on the civil rights movement to the re- election of president obama, the pervasive association with black people and the ghetto betrays a persistent cultural lag. it has been two generation since .chools were desegregated if till were alive today, would remember stories of lynchings peppering the "new york times." he would remember the william man -- million -man march. a black man became president of the united states. he would have been 73 had he lived. thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> we have been joined by taylor branch. i will just let you know that we have been speaking. douglas blackmon spoke. elijah anderson spoke. i would invite you to the podium and talk about the attempted second emancipation proclamation. ladies and gentlemen, taylor branch. [applause] >> thank you. thanks, paul. i don't want to pay tribute to the marc commuter line. i was only on for two extra hours. i am glad to be here. i want to pay tribute to the " washington month
's licenses and state-issued id documents. >> now, a group of journalists discuss the 2012 elections and the future of the republican party. they comment on why mitt romney lost the presidential election and the strategies republicans should utilize to appeal to a wider range of voters. among the participants are weekly standard editor bill kristol and msnbc host and former congressman joe scarborough. this forum was part of a conference hosted by the national review institute that examined the future of conservativism. it runs about 90 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> hi, everyone. wow, wow. incredibly loud, louder than i thought. apologize. i apologize to your eardrums. i'm with national review, and this is our panel on what's wrong with the right. it's going to take the next 72 hours, so i hope you all have provisions for the next couple of days. i'm here with john pod hotter and bill kristol, founder and editor of "the weekly standard," and we're going to get right into it. john podhoretz -- >> podhoretz -- >> john podhoretz, you wrote a book a few years back called "bush co
at the numbers. 55 democrats, 45 republicans currently. in 2014, 33 seats will be up for re-election. don't go the way of general elections. congressman frost what do you think is going to happen? >> well, first of all, this is a subject i know a fair amount about. i was chairman of the democratic congressional campaign committee in 1998, the last time you had the so-called six year itch when the president's party is supposed to lose seats in the sixth year of the president's term. we actually picked up five seats in the house and we broke even in the senate. but what is happening here is that the republican party actually had this same opportunity in 2010 and 2012 and they nominated candidates that were too far to the right and lost some races they shouldn't have lost that happened in missouri and in indiana and in this last election it happened in delaware and colorado and nevada two years before that we will have to see what happens. if the republican party keeps nominating people too far to the right, they may snatch defeat out of jaws of victory once again. >> interesting you brought up t
believes since the re-election, the president has gotten more come bative. in the latest fox poll released shortly before the inauguration, 55% of voters said he has been more confrontationm toward congressional republicans. only 30% said he has been more bipartisan. >> i regret that i didn't hear one word from the president about it's time we all sat down and worked together. an addressed these issues that are confronting the nation. it is what it is. >> white house officials note the president tried for weeks to work out a budget deal with boehner. >> even though - wildly recognized to have been made in good faith and to have represented an effort to meet the republicans halfway, the republicans walked away. >> now boehner's aides note the president warned the speaker if he didn't agree to tax increases and a long-term hi ceiling, the president would campaign against him for the next two years, charging he caused another recession. which is why boehner's aides say anailiation is the right word. >> bret: ed henry live on the north lawn. thank you. what do republicans plan to do about it?
will not be eligible to run for a third term. iraq is due to hold general elections next year. they said they will appeal the legislation the change to the law was made while the opposition grows. a sniper can from two soldiers on saturday. for several weeks protesters have been demonstrating against what they saw as the secretary of policies. six people were killed while trying to march through the city. >> protesters burning tires what the main highway from iraq to jordan saying they would stay there until their demands were met. they later dissipated. they come from a funeral of six protesters who were killed by iraqi soldiers. they're saying they're being discriminated against in this country. to iraqi soldiers were shot dead at a checkpoint. they say they have withdrawn collusion and have given a over to the federal police. that is meant by a political crisis in baghdad. the parliament on saturday passed a law saying that any prime minister cannot run for a third term in and he cannot run a term for elections next year. the prime minister's office a that is unconstitutional. it may
, chuck schumer of new york and newly elected republican senator ted cruz of texas. welcome back as senator cruz to "meet the press." back to both of you. i want to start on the gun debate. because as i say, even before the second term is officially underway thissy is bait is well underway. here are the highlights of what the president wants to accomplish. universal background checks. he'd like to pursue a ban on high capacity magazines. an assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004. and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne lapierre of the nra very hard when this came up, i challenge you as well with a question of, is this really going to make a difference? and rich lawry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so often committed by young men with no criminal records who want to die. these ar
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 195 (some duplicates have been removed)